Corris on a network

Corris on a network

My recent discovery of the joy of network treadling made me look at Corris designs in a new light. Up until now, I wove the Corris effect by inserting a tabby in the design line. Although this gives lovely results, obtaining a treadling sequence with the same number of threads as the threading sequence can be challenging. Network treadling is another way to transform a design line into a treadling sequence — no tabby required. This makes it a lot easier to align the threading and treadling sequence. So, I decided to put Corris on a network.

An efficient experiment with echo

An efficient experiment with echo

After having woven my first shawl with 4 echoes, I find myself completely submerged in the echoes techniques set forth by Marian Stubenitsky in her book ‘Weaving with Echo and Iris’. I have so many things I would like to try out, that I can easily keep myself busy for months. So, I decided to be efficient and combine several experiments into one project. I wove my first shawl with 8 echoes — and experimented with color combinations and sett along the way.

One more echo, please

One more echo, please

This year, I have been quite intrigued with parallel warps or echos. I started out with two echos in Turned Taquete using two or four colors. Then, I expanded my skill set with the Corris effect, using three echos with three or six colors. A natural next step is to explore four echos — and this is exactly what I have been up to.

Multicolored Corris

Multicolored Corris

The Corris train keeps moving steadily. I tried a symmetric version of Corris and applied the Corris effect to a monochrome warp . Next stop: a warp with six instead of three colors. I wondered what the Corris effect would bring if I turned the color volume up, so I took a dive in my rainbow colored bamboo yarn stash to try out multicolored Corris.

Searching for symmetry

Searching for symmetry

The first shawls I made using the Corris effect had wavelike patterns. After these more abstract experiments, I wanted to apply the Corris effect to patterns with motifs such as flowers and stars. In my personal opinion, these motifs look best when they have a certain symmetry to them. However, when applying the Corris effect to a symmetric twill motif, the symmetry gets lost. To overcome this, I changed the rules of the Corris effect up a bit.