Monochrome Corris

Monochrome Corris

The Corris effect is a great way to achieve a beautiful interplay of colors. Since I love color, I was naturally drawn towards making multiple-colored designs when I first started playing around with the Corris effect. I combined three bright colors in the warp with a background color as weft. After some time, I wondered whether the Corris effect could also be used with a more monochromatic warp. It turns out that Corris gives equally interesting results when toning the warp color contrast way down.
Searching for symmetry

Searching for symmetry

The first shawls I made using the Corris effect had wavelike patterns. After these more abstract experiments, I wanted to apply the Corris effect to patterns with motifs such as flowers and stars. In my personal opinion, these motifs look best when they have a certain symmetry to them. However, when applying the Corris effect to a symmetric twill motif, the symmetry gets lost. To overcome this, I changed the rules of the Corris effect up a bit.
A rainbow of stars

A rainbow of stars

A while ago, I combined two of my favorite things in a handwoven shawl -- stars and rainbows. I love weaving star-shaped motifs and using rainbow colors to do so adds to the enjoyment. The weather in June has been quite warm thus-far, so I have not worn the shawl much. Still, given that we are celebrating June as Pride Month this year, I thought it would be nice to share the shawl with you.
Old ingredients, new recipe

Old ingredients, new recipe

There are quite some choices to make when designing a shawl: weave structure, design, yarn and color. Sometimes, most of these ingredients are lying around and all I need to do is combine them. This was the case for the shawl I made for my husband.
Unencumbered weaving

Unencumbered weaving

Keeping things simple is difficult for me. I usually have to print out threading and treadling sequences of a weaving project, as the sequences are simply to long to know by heart. The set of kitchen towels I recently made was an exception to this custom. Just a straight twill threading and a very easy threadling sequence. No cheat sheets, just unencumbered weaving.