One more echo, please

One more echo, please

This year, I have been quite intrigued with parallel warps or echos. I started out with two echos in Turned Taquete using two or four colors. Then, I expanded my skill set with the Corris effect, using three echos with three or six colors. A natural next step is to explore four echos — and this is exactly what I have been up to.

Monochrome Corris

Monochrome Corris

The Corris effect is a great way to achieve a beautiful interplay of colors. Since I love color, I was naturally drawn towards making multiple-colored designs when I first started playing around with the Corris effect. I combined three bright colors in the warp with a background color as weft. After some time, I wondered whether the Corris effect could also be used with a more monochromatic warp. It turns out that Corris gives equally interesting results when toning the warp color contrast way down.

Unencumbered weaving

Unencumbered weaving

Keeping things simple is difficult for me. I usually have to print out threading and treadling sequences of a weaving project, as the sequences are simply to long to know by heart. The set of kitchen towels I recently made was an exception to this custom. Just a straight twill threading and a very easy threadling sequence. No cheat sheets, just unencumbered weaving.

Crazy about Corris

Crazy about Corris

A while ago, I was browsing Handweaving.net and stumbled upon some weaving drafts using the Corris effect. I had no idea what the Corris effect was, but the drafts looked lovely. In this post, I share my experience of weaving Corris for the first time.

Fun with Fibonacci

Fun with Fibonacci

Perhaps one of the most well-known mathematical concepts in the world of handcrafts is the Fibonacci sequence.In one of my latest hand weaving projects, I used the Fibonacci sequence to design a wavelike pattern.